• 23rd July
    2014
  • 23
  • 23rd July
    2014
  • 23
shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.
But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.
What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.
Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.

But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.

What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?

But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.

Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

(Source: plainpictures, via ellietheasexylibrarian)

  • 21st July
    2014
  • 21
  • 21st July
    2014
  • 21
fughtopia:





Aussies Against The Abbott Government


 



 
Abbott gets asked some tough questions by the very impressive Sarah Ferguson. SARAH FERGUSON: The reason I ask these questions is: you’re the person that made the election about trust. You said famously that the worst deficit is not the budget deficit: it’s in fact the trust deficit, the election is about trust. You’re the one that set the standard. Do you accept now that you were not able to keep to your own standard? TONY ABBOTT: And plainly, Sarah, you obviously have a perspective which you are doing your best to prosecute. SARAH FERGUSON: With respect, Mr Abbott, it’s not a perspective: it’s a simple matter of language. You said one thing, you’ve done another. I think people have been waiting to hear you come clean and admit that that’s what happened? Watch the exchange: bit.ly/FergSlapdown

fughtopia:

 

Abbott gets asked some tough questions by the very impressive Sarah Ferguson.

SARAH FERGUSON: The reason I ask these questions is: you’re the person that made the election about trust. You said famously that the worst deficit is not the budget deficit: it’s in fact the trust deficit, the election is about trust. You’re the one that set the standard. Do you accept now that you were not able to keep to your own standard?

TONY ABBOTT: And plainly, Sarah, you obviously have a perspective which you are doing your best to prosecute.

SARAH FERGUSON: With respect, Mr Abbott, it’s not a perspective: it’s a simple matter of language. You said one thing, you’ve done another. I think people have been waiting to hear you come clean and admit that that’s what happened?

Watch the exchange: bit.ly/FergSlapdown

(via caitlin939)

  • 21st July
    2014
  • 21
  • 20th July
    2014
  • 20
End of the road for "Makin' Tracks"

black-australia:

Doesn’t the government see that these funding cuts will inevitably ruin lives?!

  • 18th July
    2014
  • 18

The biggest issue with equating the library with a Netflix for books is that it sends a false message that libraries are worth little more than $8 or $12 or $20 a month. That the services offered in libraries are little more than options to which people can subscribe, rather than actual services anyone can utilize at any time.

When the library is made to be seen as a business, rather than the heart of a community or a fundamental service made possible through citizen-approved tax dollars, it makes the library expendable. That expendability then moves down the chain: staff salaries get cut, then staff withers, then more programs and projects that benefit the community — books and movies and CDs and magazines and newspapers and wifi and computer access and database subscriptions and programs for all shapes, colors, and sizes of people — disappear, too. It detracts from the unique aspects that make a library what it is: a place for all, rather than a place for some.

Libraries reach out where Netflix reaches in.

  • 17th July
    2014
  • 17
  • 14th July
    2014
  • 14
Nobody's Son

"The problem, you see, is that I didn’t think he’d ever die, that his voice would ever be gone from this world. I knew it, but I didn’t, just like I know now that he’s dead—I can talk about it, can report it to the Social Security Administration, which sends its condolences—but I don’t, not really. I’m having trouble with the word “gone.” Gone where? For how long? I have moments when I have to fight the urge to pick up the phone on the off chance that my stepmother will answer and say, in that dutiful voice, “Yes, he’s right here, he’s coming,” and hand him the phone so he can spend the next ten minutes pretending he can hear me, before saying, “Good, that’s good—I didn’t quite get all of that—can you write it to me?” I keep wanting to send him an e-mail, just hit “reply” and tell him that we’re fine, that our son’s back from Ecuador, that the bullfrogs are back in the cove. When I scroll back through my inbox, his name appears, six pages back, then quickly multiplies: four e-mails on page eight, then two, then six. Amazing how much it hurts to page forward, to see his name disappear. I did it the other day, pressing “newer,” then “older,” over and over, hoping to inoculate myself. I don’t recommend it."

  • 10th July
    2014
  • 10
The more you alienate men with feminism and not "allowing them to be allies", the less likely they will be to support it. Just saying from personal experience.

Asked by: Anonymous

nextyearsgirl:

Men who need to have their heads patted and their egos catered to were never going to be good allies in the first place.